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HOPE works in more than 35 countries worldwide. Please enjoy our blog as we document the successes and challenges of our work to provide Health Opportunities for People Everywhere.

Dr. Kenyon in Shanghai

Posted By Lily Hsu, Project HOPE Shanghai on July 13, 2016

Labels: China , Global Health Expertise

Dr. Tom Kenyon with Vice Mayor of Shanghai Ms. Weng Tie Hui

Dr. Kenyon arrived in Shanghai, China this morning to visit with leaders of various health care institutions and explore ways in which Project HOPE may be of assistance in the future. This being his first visit to Shanghai, Dr. Kenyon also took some time to visit Shanghai Children’s Medical Center (SCMC), which Project HOPE helped establish and where we conduct several programs. 

Dr. Kenyon, Linda Heitzman and I met with Dr. Huang Hong, Secretary General of the Shanghai Health and Family Planning Commission. Dr. Huang, who was a HOPE fellow at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin in 2003, praised Project HOPE’s work in Shanghai and in Dujiangyan City following the 2008 earthquake there. She also thanked Project HOPE for its support of SCMC, noting that the hospital in now well-known in China for providing excellent care to children with acute illnesses, especially congenital heart disease and cancer. 

Dr. Huang shared with Dr. Kenyon some of Shanghai’s most pressing health challenges: acute infections that are mostly contracted from abroad, noncommunicable diseases due to improving economic development, and an aging population with higher incidences of diabetes, heart disease and cancer. It will be important for Shanghai to improve its community health service capacity. Shanghai has 2.2 million children aged 0-14 years; however, the city only has 3,200 pediatricians and around 3,200 beds for pediatric patients that must also accommodate some patients who travel to Shanghai for medical care who are from other areas.

Dr. Tom Kenyon at the Shanghai Children's Medical Center

In the afternoon, we met the Vice Mayor of Shanghai, Ms. Weng, Tie Hui at City Hall. It was an honor to meet the Vice Mayor given her busy daily schedule. Ms. Weng is very familiar with Project HOPE’s work in Shanghai, especially at SCMC. She thanked us for our support and mentioned that SCMC is a very famous pediatric hospital in China now. On behalf of the Shanghai government, the Vice Mayor thanked us for our vision and long-term, sustained support. 

Ms. Weng outlined some of the local health issues. She said that the average life expectancy of Shanghai residents is about 82 years, and the health care system must provide good care for its residents and people from other provinces who seek advanced medical treatment in Shanghai. In addition to ensuring that Shanghai residents have sufficient health care services, the Vice Mayor also mentioned that the Shanghai government has spent 1 billion USD providing tremendous support toward health facility infrastructure development and health care worker training to eleven less developed regions of China. At SCMC, patients from less developed countries like Morocco also receive treatment. Shanghai’s support to Kashi City and four counties of the Xin Jiang Autonomous Region significantly improved maternal and child health and decreased the infant mortality rate by 20%.

Dr. Tom Kenyon visits the Shanghai Children's Medical Center

Dr. Kenyon shared with the Vice Mayor that Project HOPE award Mr. Jian Zhongi, President of SCMC our 2016 Global Health Partner Award for his leadership and years of collaboration with Project HOPE in solving global challenges in pediatric health. Ms. Weng was delighted to know it. Dr. Kenyon also stated that SCMC’s success is based on its leadership’s vision and its staff’s diligent contributions.  Dr. Kenyon is glad to know that SCMC has the capacity to help other regions of China and other countries to improve pediatric health care. 

Dr. Kenyon also noted that the recent Chinese health reforms which emphasize primary care are important tasks for the government. While Project HOPE currently has a few projects in China – especially in pediatric asthma and adult diabetes care - he would also like to see Project HOPE help build a mechanism to enhance community health services and capacity. 

Dr. Kenyon ended the visit with the Vice Mayor by saying that he is looking for further dialogue to find opportunities for future collaborations.  The Vice Mayor said that the collaboration between Project HOPE and SCMC has lasted about 30 years, and Dr. Kenyon mentioned that he intends for Project HOPE to have further fruitful collaborations in Shanghai for the next 30 years.


HOPE Volunteer Completes Mission in Cambodia

Posted By Susan Opas on June 30, 2016

Labels: Cambodia , Humanitarian Aid, Volunteers

Patients waiting to be seen in Kampot Province, Cambodia during Pacific Angel 16-2

Susan Opas is a pediatric nurse practitioner from Woodland Hills, CA who volunteered for Project HOPE on Pacific Angel 16-2, a humanitarian and civic assistance mission led by the Royal Cambodian Armed Forces working alongside their U.S., Thai, Vietnamese and Australian counterparts and volunteers from nongovernmental organizations like Project HOPE in Kampot Province, Cambodia. Susan treated pediatric patients at two makeshift clinics over the course of five days in mid-June 2016. Pacific Angel 16-2 was Susan’s sixth volunteer mission with Project HOPE.

The second site of this mission was truly within farmland. The fields in the area were wide open, growing sugar cane, rice, vegetables and coconuts. This area was more established than the first site, but the classroom (our clinic site) was filled with dirt and cobwebs and was dark as a dungeon. It took a lot of time to move desks and sweep with masks on to be ready. There were two small windows on each side of the room with little ventilation. The Air Force brought a generator and fans which worked until the fuel ran out. There was no electricity, so evaluating children in near dark was going to be difficult.

Project HOPE volunteer nurse practitioner Susan Opas checks a young patient's ears on Pacific Angel 16-2

We were at this site for two days: June 17-18. Among the children’s diagnoses I provided were for another heart problem (hole between the ventricles), hernia, leg pain (growing pains), anemia, fever, headaches and dehydration, stomach aches, poor eaters, and minor skin issues. However, my teammates saw a teen post-motorbike accident who had two gaping wound and had been going to the local hospital every other day to be redressed. They also saw some major hernias, suspected TB, head trauma, a history of nose bleeds and all the other imaginable childhood issues we see at home.

At the end of the second day, a small group of us took sunglasses to the local hospital and got a tour. They have the basics. There is no central monitoring in the ICU. Patients share a large room. The newborn ICU consists of two isolettes. In the maternity ward, babies are in beds with the moms. In all cases, the families stay, provide basic hygiene care and bring food.

During the five days of this mission, we provided health assessments and minor interventions – antibiotics, inhalants, anti-inflammatories, wound cleansings, looking in ears and throats - to 3,486 patients. At the least they left with vitamins, a toothbrush and sunglasses.


Treating Children in Cambodia

Posted By Susan Opas on June 29, 2016

Labels: Cambodia, Southeast Asia and the Middle East , Humanitarian Aid, Volunteers

The pediatrics team on Pacific Angel 16-2 includes Project HOPE volunteer Susan Opas

Susan Opas is a pediatric nurse practitioner from Woodland Hills, CA who volunteered for Project HOPE on PacificAngel 16-2, a humanitarian and civic assistance mission led by the Royal Cambodian Armed Forces working alongside their U.S., Thai, Vietnamese and Australian counterparts and volunteers from nongovernmental organizations like Project HOPE in Kampot Province, Cambodia. Susan treated pediatric patients at two makeshift clinics over the course of five days in mid-June 2016. Pacific Angel 16-2 was Susan’s sixth volunteer mission with Project HOPE.

This mission began June 11 with a day to complete set-up that several U.S. Air Force and Australian Air Force volunteers started the day before. Our goal was to serve two community locations in the very south, central area of Cambodia. Both locations are in farming areas, but the first was quite more distressed than the second. In both settings we used local schools: the first was a middle school, and the second was an elementary school connected to a Buddhist wat (temple), which was incredibly gorgeous with walls and ceilings totally painted with Buddhist scenes.

Our first true day of mission work was June 13. Our clinics consisted of dental, optometry, general medicine, pediatrics, physical therapy and a pharmacy. The medicines provided were quite variable, so we had to stretch at times to utilize what we had. An example is loratadine (Claritin) for unavailable Benadryl. In addition to seeing patients, in pediatrics we each also dispensed our medication and, with interpreters, educated the patients’ parents about the medications.

My very first patient was an 8-year-old with subcutaneous tuberculosis. Yep, quarter-sized cysts full of TB. The next had his heart in the right side of his chest instead of the left along with a larger murmur, which seemed to be a hole in his ventricle. Cambodia has a much better referral system than other countries. So, our infectious disease person and the local hospital director coordinated the TB patient’s transfer and set up a plan for us to follow the patient’s routing throughout the mission.

Project HOPE volunteer Susan Opas joins Pacific Angel 16-2 in Kampot Province, Cambodia

The next day again I started with another heart murmur known as Stills Murmur, which is seen when significant anemia is present. Rice is the staple of life here, although I noticed on our van ride one hour from town that there are cows, chickens, turkeys and pigs. In some situations parents had the same complaints as in the U.S.: kids want the sugar and chips and somehow they have the money to get these. I saw lots of beer and soda available along the roadside.

On the third day, the last at this site, the number of patients seeking pediatric care dropped. I believe this was due to the kids being in school and unable to be seen while we were available. The most involved work of the day was cleaning skin wounds caused by kids scratching their bug bites without good hand washing. We closed our section early and began packing up for the move to the second site. We were awash with “gummy vitamins,” which patients, parents, the interpreters and the military were eating like candy.

Day four was a moving day. We started on a paved road out of town, but then we were on a red, dusty dirt road or muddy single lanes with lots of divots, which kept us awake until we arrived at the second site.


Sierra Leone Crisis

A Volunteer Nurse Assesses Maternal and Newborn Health Care

Posted By J. Beryl Brooks on June 27, 2016

Labels: Africa , Sierra Leone , Humanitarian Aid, Women’s and Children’s Health, Health Care Education, Health Systems Strengthening, Volunteers

Project HOPE volunteer nurse assists in Sierra Leone.

J. Beryl Brooks, the Developmental Clinic Coordinator for Improved Pregnancy Outcome at Memorial UniversityMedical Center in Savannah, is part of a team of medical volunteers who traveled to Sierra Leone in May to conduct a rapid assessment of maternal and newborn health care in health facilities there. This humanitarian mission is in response to a re-emerging crisis in country where maternal and newborn mortality is among the highest in the world. Here she shares a portion of her journal in which she recorded her personal observations of the trip.

Continuing our visit in Bo District, we talked to a number of staff members in Labor and Delivery and Postpartum about their pre- and in-service training.

There are no phones on the wards, so it is necessary to go from place to place to communicate and get things done. This is time consuming. Most phones in use are the staff’s personal cell phones. Electricity is intermittent, a problem for many reasons: oxygen concentrator not working, no lights to view the patients, etc. We found this to be a problem last night, too; when we returned to the hospital it was hazardous to get from place to place. There is no lighting in the hallways, many of which have drop-offs, steps and gaps. There was one functioning lightbulb in the pediatric ward requiring the use of flashlights for patient observation and care.

On Monday Dr. Asibey and I continued the assessment process and began some introductory trainings for Helping BabiesBreathe® and Essential Care for Every Baby. The nursing and midwife staff began each program with hesitance, but quickly recognized the value and became very enthusiastic learners. It was a great pleasure working with them. We found that the trainings were a great way to elicit information about what was available for patient care and what the staff’s training and capabilities were, much more effective than interview and observation.

Project HOPE volunteer nurse conducts a maternal and newborn healthcare assessment in Sierra Leone.

The overall observation from our time in Sierra Leone is that the local health care professionals are overwhelmed by the responsibility of caring for very sick patients with limited supplies. Many are still very passionate about providing the best care possible despite the obstacles. Some are apathetic, but some are still willing to learn and grow. There is good teamwork and camaraderie for the most part.

On Tuesday, just before leaving for Lungi to fly home, I met Osman Kabia, Project HOPE’s Sierra Leone in-Country Consultant. He was delightful, as were all the staff members, and brought a feast prepared by his wife. What gracious and wonderful people are here in Sierra Leone. I am grateful for this opportunity.


Maternal and Newborn Health Care Crisis in Sierra Leone

A Volunteer Nurse’s Assessment

Posted By J. Beryl Brooks on June 26, 2016

Labels: Africa , Sierra Leone , Humanitarian Aid, Women’s and Children’s Health, Health Systems Strengthening, Volunteers

Volunteer nurse assists in healthcare training in Sierra Leone.

J. Beryl Brooks, the Developmental Clinic Coordinator for Improved Pregnancy Outcome at Memorial University Medical Center in Savannah, is part of a team of medical volunteers who traveled to Sierra Leone in May to conduct a rapid assessment of maternal and newborn health care in health facilities there. This humanitarian mission is in response to a re-emerging crisis in country where maternal and newborn mortality is among the highest in the world. Here she shares a portion of her journal in which she recorded her personal observations of the trip.

After we arrived at the Lungi airport in Sierra Leone, we took an exhilarating (bumpy) ferry ride to Freetown. I met Dr. Asibey, a pediatrician from Ghana who will be working on the team, on the plane and we were able to talk together briefly during the stop in Monrovia. She is very nice and very enthusiastic about the assignment.

The Project HOPE staff had paved the path for us, so getting from airport to hotel went smoothly. We then met the rest of the team: Mariam, HOPE’s in-country coordinator; Sheka, the driver; and Dr. Little, a neonatologist from Dartmouth, NH. The next day we met with the Chief Medical Officer for the Ministry of Health for Sierra Leone, who was also very helpful.

After Freetown, we traveled to Bo, about a three-hour ride, passing through many villages and forested areas along the way. At the Bo District Health Compound, local staff members attended a workshop on Helping Babies Breathe® presented by Dr. Little with some assistance from Dr. Asibey and me. The staff was very interested and had a lot of questions.

We also met with local officials including the District Health Officer and did a walk-through assessment of the hospital and facilities. Other assessments here included a rural clinic and the labor and delivery area of the hospital – where we assisted with the delivery of a beautiful baby boy.

Project HOPE volunteer nurse in Sierra Leone helps deliver baby boy.

We noted that the clinic we visited seemed farther from town than it actually was because of the rough condition of the road – a difficult journey for a sick or laboring patient traveling from the health clinic to the Bo District Hospital, especially since most transportation is on the back of a motorbike.

Upon entering any facility, staff directs you to wash your hands, and your temperature is taken and shown to you – an attempt to prevent the resurgence of Ebola.

At the end of the week, we went to the postpartum unit of the hospital where they were prepping a case for surgery. After observing the surgical prep, we headed to the antenatal and postnatal clinic, which involved climbing over rebar and other construction materials and debris. We envisioned what it must be like for pregnant women and mothers with newborns to negotiate this same obstacle course.

There, Dr. Asibey was able to help stabilize a malaria case that came in with active seizures. She also helped another patient with severe anemia and possible renal failure.

This was a very long day due to a severe lack of supplies and equipment. Some medications were unavailable at the hospital pharmacy, so Mariam went to the local pharmacy to purchase them. The staff is very nice, trying to do the best they can, but definitely could use help.


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